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 Rossall Sea Defences

Sea Defences at Rossall Hospital
Sea defences at Rossall Hospital

Sea defences from Rossall Hospital
Sea defences from Rossall Hospital

Sea defences at Fairway, Fleetwood
Sea defences at Fairway, Fleetwood

 

 

Approval of Plans for Rossall Sea Defence Scheme

New flood defences between Rossall Hospital and Fleetwood Golf Course have received the final seal of approval from the government.

Defra and the Environment Agency have formally approved £86million of funding and given the green light for work to start on a series of major new coastal defences at Anchorsholme and Rossall, one of the largest flood defence programmes in the UK.

Blackpool and Wyre Councils are working in partnership to improve and replace sea defences between Rossall Hospital and Rossall Point and from Kingsway to Little Bispham at Anchorsholme, protecting 12,000 properties from the risk of coastal flooding.

Councillor Roger Berry, Cabinet member with responsibility for sea defences at Wyre Council, said: “This news is the culmination of a tremendous amount of work by all involved and I'm delighted that we can now get started with making vital improvements to our seawall.

"Although Rossall and Anchorsholme are two different schemes in terms of the type of defences required, Wyre and Blackpool Councils along with the Environment Agency have formed a very fruitful collaboration to ensure the future protection of the Fylde Coast.

Councillor Fred Jackson, Cabinet member for Urban Regeneration at Blackpool Council, said: “We are ecstatic the grant approval letters have arrived for the Anchorsholme Coast Protection Scheme and the work to improve our coastal defences can commence.

“The reconstruction of the seawall is of huge importance and will protect the community of Anchorsholme, their homes, local businesses and highways from flooding and coastal erosion, whilst improving access to the beach.

"The huge programme of work is expected to be complete in 2015."

Councillor Derek Antrobus, Chair of the Regional Flood and Coastal Committee, said: “We are committed to reducing the risk of flooding to as many homes and businesses in the North West as possible with the money available.

"The Rossall and Anchorsholme flood defence scheme is one of the biggest currently planned in the UK, which is fantastic for our region and a really positive step towards making communities living on our coastline as resilient to flooding as possible."

Construction is due to start at both sites in the new year.


More about the Project

The Fylde Peninsular Coastal Programme has secured £86m of funding from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) - £64m for Rossall and £22m for Anchorsholme.

A £17m bid for Fairhaven Lake and Church Scar is currently underway.

The flood defences are old and could fail during a major storm, resulting in significant flooding to low lying properties in the area.

The most recent major flood events occurred in 1927, which resulted in the deaths of six people, and 1977 when over 1,800 properties flooded following a breach of the sea defences. 

The sea defences at Rossall protect 7500 very low lying properties and have been recognised nationally as one of the highest risk and most important areas for improvement in England.

The area is subjected to some of the highest waves and currents on the Fylde Coast.

Due to this part of the coastline being very exposed to the harsh environment, with a shingle beach, the seawall suffers frequent damage. A lower rock revetment has proven to be the most suitable option. The upper part of the seawall, outside of the damage zone, will be concrete.

Tremendous support has been received from the local community for the scheme; over 1500 residents signed pledges of support, businesses including Regenda housing association, which manages 900 properties in the area, and Fleetwood Town Football Club made financial contributions, and Fleetwood Town Council increased its annual precept to support the scheme.

Following consultation with members of the angling community, the original design has been adapted to reduce the quantity of rock and provide a lower level promenade, which will allow angling to continue along this stretch of coastline.

Work is due to start on Rossall and Anchorsholme schemes in winter 2013/14 and be completed in 2016/17.


Planning application 13/00501/LMAJ

At the above link you can find all the detailed information which has been submitted as part of this planning application.

The Rossall Scheme will protect 7497 properties and vital infrastructure from flooding. The existing sea defences are considered to be past their lifespan and progressively failing to the point that ongoing maintenance isn't practical - the front wall was built in the 1930's and the rear flood wall in the 1970's after the last significant floods.

The new scheme will cover a 2km stretch from Westway to the start of the golf course. It follows the line of the existing defences with no changes to alignment and the width of it ranges from 100 to 130m from the seawall to Fairway, and it's 0.5m higher than the existing.

The existing defences will be overlaid with the new, with rock armour revetment and a two tier promenade incorporating intermediate and rear sea walls with landscaping behind.

Landscaping cross section new Rossall Sea Defences
Landscaping cross section new Rossall Sea Defences

Landscaping is being used along the existing green lawned area to soften the impact of the height increase, by creating a biodiverse ecological park with native plants, which you'll be able to enjoy along a series of paths and walkways.

Cross section of the new Rossall Sea defences to be built at Fleetwood
Cross section of the new Rossall Sea defences to be built at Fleetwood

Hydraulic modelling has been used to understand the effect of wave-overtopping and scour, the effects on the waves and the movement of sediment, and along with a desk study this information has been used to design the cross section.

Terminal groynes in the new Rossall Sea defences to be built at Fleetwood
Terminal groynes in the new Rossall Sea defences to be built at Fleetwood

Two terminal groynes will be included in the design to encourage beach accretion. The existing timber groynes will be rebuilt in timber and rock on the same alignment. New slades, beach access ramps, an increased number of steps and access from the upper and lower promenades will all be incorporated in the new design. The promenade will be cast in dark grey concrete, and there will be no lighting.  


The sea defences along our coastline are replaced according to the risk of flooding.

The ingenuity and flair of designers and engineers has given us a promenade and public space at Cleveleys that has won awards and is a space to be proud of, while protecting over 8,700 properties and 219 industrial units from flooding to a 1 in 200 year standard.

The beach at North/Rossall Promenade at Cleveleys isn’t considered to be at risk of flooding, and as such is unlikely to be rebuilt for at least another 10 to 15 years.

However, the area around the coast in the Rossall stretch around Fairway is getting to the end of its useful life and is the section to which this funding relates for a major engineering construction project.

The section scheduled for replacement is the area from Rossall Hospital at the end of Fairway through to Fleetwood Golf Club/Rossall Point, which is a long length of coastline of about 1.9km. New sea defences would protect 7,495 properties from flooding including businesses and a number of public buildings, including the NHS Pensions office, Fleetwood High School, Rossall Hospital and many more besides.

The approved strategy was put to the Environment Agency National Project Board in December 2011. A Business Case was then put together and submitted back to the same board in Feb/March 2012. Local residents were asked to show their backing for the Shoreline Strategy Plan, so that a formal grant application could be made in February 2013, upon which the positive decision was made to grant funding.

The existing sea defences at Rossall have been estimated as having a potential effective lifespan left of less than five years.

Works will also include the prom on Princes Way at Anchorsholme as one package, and Birse Coastal secured the contract against tenders which went out for the contract in early 2012 (you can read about the Anchorsholme Sea Defence scheme here). Blackpool and Wyre Council have worked together to draw down the funds and manage the project as one team, to deliver better value for money by combining the contracts and make better use of expertise and resources.

The highly successful Cleveleys scheme finishes at the Blackpool boundary at Kingsway, where the promenade at Anchorsholme continues as Princes Way. Blackpool's engineers have determined that the sea wall on Princes Way is in a progressive mode of failure.

The new scheme will involve the reconstruction of 1km of defences at Anchorsholme as a concrete sea wall and promenade to match Cleveleys, with landscaping details.

The works are expected to take 84 months to complete.

The proposed work at Rossall will include the replacement of the revetments, seawall, promenade and rear wall, along with works to the grassed lagoon area and floodwater channel on the landward side. This section of coastline takes an enormous amount of battering from the elements and is hammered by the tides. Along a changing coastline, the depth of the sea defences is also greater here than at other parts of Cleveleys, is wide from front to back, and has a high wall to the rear, which means that there is a greater volume of construction materials required, at a much greater cost.

It’s also a totally different landscape to the formality of the promenade in the centre of Cleveleys – a more natural and almost wild place which is ideal for solitude and walking and natural history. These physical characteristics are being incorporated into the design, which also takes into account the results of a full public consultation which was carried out in early 2010. Beach users and residents were consulted about how they would like to see the design of the sea defences take shape, and what pastimes the area and beach was used for.

The final design will be capable of dispersing the energy of the waves as they crash against the shore, and will stand the constant battering. The top section and promenade is likely to be ‘Cleveleys-esque’ in its construction, with a walkway and top stepped section in cast concrete to create a pleasant environment that links the coastline to Cleveleys and Fleetwood and develops the public open space of the Wyre coastline as a resource that people want to use and enjoy.

The storm channel area at the road side of the sea defences along Fairway will also get a complete facelift, with landscaping works and re-modelling to create an improved green open space.

 
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