Section Heading Graphic
 

 Wyre Light Fleetwood, Wreck TrekWyre Light Fleetwood, Wreck Trek

Lower Lighthouse on Fleetwood promenadeLower Lighthouse on Fleetwood promenade

Upper or Pharos lighthouse at FleetwoodUpper or Pharos lighthouse at Fleetwood

Fleetwood Lighthouses

Fleetwood is unique in the UK in that it’s home to three lighthouses. Two stone ones are easy to spot, but the third might take you a little longer to find.

Decimus Burton was the architect who laid out Fleetwood, in its radiating grid pattern as a new town.

He also designed two lighthouses for the town, the Pharos and Beach Lighthouses, both opened in 1840, also known as the Upper and Lower lighthouses. They are both still fully operational.

The third one is the Wyre Light, built in 1839-40 by Alexander Mitchell, which stands offshore where the Irish Sea meets the estuary of the River Wyre on the northeast corner of North Wharf.

This is also unique, because it was the first screw pile lighthouse to be built and lit in Britain. Wyre Light sits on seven screw piles, driven into the seabed.

Have a look at this great bit of aerial footage filmed by 'Blackpool FPV', which shows the seafront area of Fleetwood and the lighthouses.


Wyre Light

Wyre Light as you see it in the Wyre River channel
Wyre Light as you see it in the Wyre River channel

Wyre Light
Thanks to Mark Kimber who took this excellent close-up photo of the Wyre Light while he was out sailing in April 2015

Operational Wyre Lighthouse
A photo of Wyre Lighthouse when it was operational, thanks to Maureen Blair.

Each year, the RNLI took a guided tour known as the ‘Wreck Trek’ out into the estuary to the Wyre Light, which stands in dangerous waters to the casual walker.

The Wreck Trek hasn't taken place for a couple of years because the sands have been muddy and unsafe for walkers.

North Wharf is a huge sandbank that stretches out from Fleetwood to the edge of the Lune Deep in Morecambe Bay.

A team of local people led by Fleetwood Civic Society are hoping to find out who the owners of the Wyre Light are, so that they can hopefully start the process of preserving this unique landmark for future generations.

Built in 1840, the Wyre Light is 175 years old in 2015.

You might also be interested in the Save the Wyre Lighthouse Facebook Group

Read more about the Wyre Light


Lower Lighthouse

Fleetwood Lower Lighthouse in front of the North Euston Hotel
Fleetwood Lower Lighthouse in front of the North Euston Hotel

Fleetwood Lower Lighthouse in front of the North Euston Hotel
Fleetwood Lower Lighthouse in front of the North Euston Hotel

The Beach or Lower Lighthouse (above) stands right in front of the North Euston Hotel, on the Esplanade. Around the base of it are seats built into the walls and it’s a well known local landmark on the seafront – which at this point is the venue for many a holiday maker or local person to sit a while and watch the view, or enjoy a leisurely stroll along the promenade.

Fleetwood Civic Society open the lighthouse each year as part of the Heritage Week events in early September, so you can actually go inside it and take in the spectacular view from the top.

The light from this lighthouse can be seen for nine miles, and is 30 feet above high water.


Upper Lighthouse

Fleetwood Upper Lighthouse seen from North Albert StreetFleetwood Upper Lighthouse seen from North Albert Street

The Pharos, or to give it it’s usual name, Upper Lighthouse (above) stands on Pharos Street not far from where it meets North Albert Street, against the tram tracks and overhead power cables, and in sight of the seafront. It’s named after the ancient lighthouse Pharos of Alexandria.

Its light is 90 feet above high water, and the additional height means that it can be seen for 13 miles. It’s a quite huge structure when you’re stood underneath it, and another local landmark to orientate yourself in the streets of Fleetwood. It’s not surprising that there are 107 steps and a 10’ ladder to get to the top.

The two stone lighthouses on land are each built in the exact spot so that when ships had them lined up, with the taller Pharos lighthouse behind and above the lower Beach lighthouse, they knew that they had safe passage into the Wyre estuary and could dock safely at Fleetwood.


Read More

Save the Wyre Lighthouse Facebook Group

Fleetwood Civic Society

Fleetwood Heritage Open Days

Wreck Trek

Wyre Light

 
footnote  

Why don't you Sign Up to Keep Up?
Register for weekly email updates from Visit Fleetwood and keep up to date with what's happening, what's new on this site, offers and news.

footnote   The content of this page is subject to The Rabbit Patch Copyright Terms and Conditions ©
 
.