Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme at Fleetwood seafront

Look at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

The Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme opened in June 2018. It’s function is to prevent flooding, but it’s also an amazing public facility for Fleetwood.

Take a look around this magnificent piece of civil engineering in this video:

In this page you can take a look around the seafront as it looks now that the work is completed. See how the sea wall was built. Explore Larkholme Grasslands and the artworks. And remember how it looked before work began!

The Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

The Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme includes 2km of new sea defences (just over a mile) between Westway and Fleetwood Golf Course.

The scheme took four years to construct, at a cost of £64m. It protects 7,500 properties from the risk of flooding.

It includes new revetments, seawall, promenade and rear wall. Plus works to the grassed lagoon area (now known as Larkholme Grasslands) and floodwater channel on the landward side.

Aerial view of the first complete section of the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, May 2017
Aerial view of the first complete section of the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, May 2017

This section of coastline takes an enormous amount of battering from the elements and is hammered by the tides. It’s very exposed to the harsh environment. With a shingle beach, the seawall suffers frequent damage. That’s why the lower revetment is made in rock.

The next video explains how sea defences work. Carry on reading to see how this sea wall was built.

Levels of Protection

Rossall sea wall is built in levels. Rock armour rises from the beach to absorb the worst of the abrasive waves. Then the upper part of the seawall, outside of the damage zone, is concrete.

Rock armour rising out of the beach at the new Rossall sea wall
Rock armour rising out of the beach at the new Rossall sea wall

The unevenness of the rocks helps to absorb the energy of the waves. The voids between them are just as important as the actual rocks themselves. This photo is taken on a very still day!

Rocks and voids between them dissipate the energy of the sea
Rocks and voids between them dissipate the energy of the sea

A ‘berm’ or spacing footpath separates the rock from the next section – precast concrete steps. At the top of the steps there’s a wave wall – it’s curved to reflect waves back to sea.

Rock, berm, steps and wave wall at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Rock, berm, steps and wave wall at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

The whole defence is wide from front to back, with a high wall to the rear. A huge volume of construction materials was required, reflected in the cost.

The promenade itself is built in two levels to catch any overtopping. Finally the rear flood wall is the last line of defence for waves.

Split level promenade at Rossall sea wall
Split level promenade at Rossall sea wall

An Amazing Public Space

The design disperses the energy of the waves as they crash against the shore, and withstands the constant battering. The wide walkway and split level upper promenade is a pleasant environment linking the coastline between Cleveleys and Fleetwood. It’s an amazing public open space for people to enjoy.

This video was made on 7 May 2020 as part of the ‘Walk on the Beach’ series, filmed during coronavirus lockdown. It ends on Larkholme Grasslands –

Beyond the wall is the overflow channel which runs along Larkholme Grasslands. It’s purpose is to collect any spray and overtopping that makes it over the wall.

Looking along the rear flood wall at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, with Larkholme Grasslands beyond
Looking along the rear flood wall at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, with Larkholme Grasslands beyond

Before and After

This aerial video clip was taken in November 2016 while construction was still underway. See how the wall is being replaced from the southern end of the scheme at Westway, to the northern end of the scheme adjacent to Fleetwood Golf Course.

You can also see how significantly bigger the new sea defences are. The old sea wall is still visible at the northern end, seen towards the end of the clip.

Larkholme Grasslands

There’s now an ecology park on the landward side of the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, between West Way and Fairway.

The 1.5km strip of land is now known as Larkholme Grasslands.

Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, Fleetwood
Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, Fleetwood

It was already classed as a Biological Heritage Site (BHS) before the seawall works began. BHS are wildlife sites of county-wide importance, because of the rare species of flora and fauna which grow there. This site was designated for its valuable coastal grassland.

Draft plans were unveiled for the ecology zone in January 2015, drawn up by environmental design experts from Lancashire County Council.

Following construction of the seawall, the grasslands were re-landscaped. The old concrete overflow channel (below) is now a ‘meandering swale’ with natural ponds along the way. After major earthworks the level of the ground was raised. This not only makes a more attractive landscape, it’s also reduced the visible height of the old grey seawall from the road.

You can visit Larkholme Grasslands in our videos. This video picks the walk up to carry on to the Chatsworth end near the golf course –

The new rear wall is as high as the old one (actually it’s about 30cm higher). But now that less of it is visible it’s much more attractive.

The old overflow channel and grassy bank before construction of the new Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old overflow channel and grassy bank before construction of the new Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

Restoring the native plantlife

After the earthworks, turfing, seeding and planting followed. Rarer plants were translocated away from the site when construction of the sea defences began to prevent damage. Where possible, native turf was stripped and moved from one place to another, to maintain the original flora of the site.

A number of seed collections were also taken before the works began so the same plant life could be returned to site afterwards. These seeds were grown offsite on mats and returned once the landscaping was complete.

Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

This landscaping work is the finishing touch to the fantastic new promenade. It’s a much more attractive environment for those living behind the sea defences. The ecology park makes the most of the area’s natural features, while meeting the feedback from prior consultation with the public. It celebrates the plants and insects that make the grasslands special. 

Artworks at Larkholme Grasslands

You’ll also find new artworks at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, in the grasslands between West Way and Chatsworth Avenue. Seating, pathways and bridges also make the whole area more accessible and enjoyable.

Artists impression of Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Sea Defence Works
Artists impression of Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Sea Defence Works

Lancashire County Council developed the design of the grasslands, to meet the needs of the local community and stakeholders. The specially created sculptures are designed by artist Stephen Broadbent. He also designed the artworks at Cleveleys. They bring to life the diverse range of marine species that give the area its Biological Heritage Site status.

Artists impression of Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Sea Defence Works
Artists impression of Larkholme Grasslands at Rossall Sea Defence Works

Beacons

Have you seen the colourful stainless steel grassland beacons and hand carved wooden artworks at Rossall sea wall?

Waymarker at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Waymarker at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

They’re way-finders, connecting paths to the promenade and marking pedestrian access points. Local wildlife and plants are celebrated in their design.

Details in the waymarker at Rossall sea front
Details in the waymarker at Rossall sea front

They also link the Rossall section of Fleetwood seafront to the Mythic Coast. That’s the artwork trail based on the folklore and myth surrounding our local coastline.

Mythic Coast

The Mythic Coast is an artwork trail beginning at Cleveleys, with a memorial to all the ships wrecked off the Fylde coast between 1643 and 2008. Characters from The Sea Swallow, including a giant stainless steel seashell and sea ogre carved from limestone, are dotted northwards along the promenade and beach to Rossall Point Observation Tower.

You might have noticed the inscriptions at either end of the new sea wall. This one is at the Rossall School/Cleveleys end –

Inscription from the Sea Swallow at the Rossall School end of the sea wall
Inscription from the Sea Swallow at the Rossall School end of the sea wall

This inscription reads:

Mary held out the shell, though her hands were shaking.
Still the tidal wave rose, higher and higher

The story of the Sea Swallow is told at both ends of the site, where the new seawall meets the existing. The artwork faces the sea and is visible to anyone enjoying the promenade.

The Sea Swallow units being installed at the northern end of the scheme in October 2016
The Sea Swallow units being installed at the northern end of the scheme in October 2016

Why the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme was Built

The ingenuity and flair of designers and engineers has given Fleetwood a promenade and public space to be proud of!

Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, at the West Way End
Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme, at the West Way End

The area of Wyre coastline in the Rossall stretch around Fairway was at to the end of its useful life. They’d been estimated as having a potential effective lifespan left of less than five years. The defences were progressively failing to the point that ongoing maintenance wasn’t practical.

The flood defences were old and could fail during a major storm. If they had, the results would have been disastrous. Along with significant flooding to low lying properties, businesses and critical infrastructure would have been damaged.

Past flood events

Flooding has happened before in this area. In 1927 flooding resulted in the deaths of six people. It was after this that the front wall was built in the 1930’s.

It happened again in 1977 when over 1,800 properties flooded following a breach of the sea defences. The rear flood wall, known locally as the ‘Berlin Wall’ was built after this in the late 1970’s.

Flooding in Fleetwood in 1977. Prior to Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Flooding in Fleetwood in 1977. Prior to the old sea wall being built.

The sea defences at Rossall were recognised nationally as one of the highest risk and most important areas for improvement in England. The area is subjected to some of the highest waves and currents on the Fylde Coast.

Approval of the Scheme

In October 2013, Defra and the Environment Agency formally approved £86 million of funding and gave the green light for work to start. The major new coastal defences at Anchorsholme and Rossall are one of the largest flood defence programmes in the UK.

Combined, the works between Rossall Hospital and Rossall Point and from Kingsway to Little Bispham at Anchorsholme, protect 12,000 properties from the risk of coastal flooding.

Designing a new seawall

Hydraulic modelling is used to understand the effect of wave-overtopping and scour, the effects of the waves and the movement of sediment. Along with a desk study this information is used by experts to design the cross section.

The new scheme covers 1.9km from Westway to the golf course. It follows the line of the existing defences, with no changes to alignment. The width of it ranges from 100 to 130m from the seawall to Fairway. It’s also 0.5m higher than the old sea wall. The new sea wall is built over the top of the old one.

Cross Section Drawing of Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Cross Section Drawing of Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

If you’re interested you can look at the Planning application 13/00501/LMAJ. It includes the detailed information submitted for the project.

Funding to protect 7500 properties

The new sea defences protect 7,495 properties from flooding. Plus businesses, a number of public buildings and critical infrastructure. These include the NHS Pensions office, Fleetwood High School, Rossall Hospital and more besides. Along with the Blackpool tramway and the mains sewage network.

The approved strategy was put to the Environment Agency National Project Board in December 2011. A Business Case was then put together and submitted back to the same board in Feb/March 2012.

Community Backing

Local residents were asked to show their backing for the Shoreline Strategy Plan, so that a formal grant application could be made in February 2013, upon which the positive decision was made to grant funding. Tremendous support was received from the local community for the scheme. Over 1500 residents signed pledges of support, plus businesses including Regenda housing association, which manages 900 properties in the area. Fleetwood Town Council increased its annual precept to support the project.

The Fylde Peninsula Coastal Programme secured £86m of funding from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). £64m for Rossall and £22m for Anchorsholme. A £17m bid for Fairhaven Lake and Church Scar was also successful.

Public Consultation

This section of coastline is a totally different landscape to the promenade in the centre of Cleveleys. It’s more natural, almost a wild place, ideal for solitude, walking and watching the wildlife. These characteristics are reflected in the design. The results of a full public consultation carried out in early 2010 are also taken into account. That’s why there’s no lighting and commercialisation.

Beach users and residents were consulted about how they would like to see the design of the sea defences take shape. They were asked what pastimes the area and beach was used for. Consultation with the angling community led to the original full rock revetment being changed. The design was adapted to reduce the width of rock and create the lower level berm.

New access points are also incorporated in the new design. There are slades, ramps, an increased number of steps and access from the upper and lower promenades.

Working Together

Works also included the promenade on Princes Way at Anchorsholme as one package. Birse Coastal (later to become part of Balfour Beatty) secured the contract against tenders which went out in early 2012.

Blackpool and Wyre Councils worked together to draw down the funds and manage the project as one team. That way they could deliver better value for money by combining expertise and resources.

The Anchorsholme scheme includes the reconstruction of 1km of concrete sea wall defences with promenade and landscaping details.

Building the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

Visit Fleetwood was fortunate enough to be involved in the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme throughout construction. So we got to see the complete transformation from the old, failing wall to the amazing public space it is today.

We’ve documented some of the process of how it was built below. Take a look through these updates to see the transformation into an amazing piece of public realm from an old seawall at the end of its useful life.

Site Compounds

You might remember the site offices, they were based on the car park at the end of Westway.

Site offices at Rossall sea wall works
Site offices at Rossall sea wall works

This little public information cabin was open for the duration of the works. Inside were plans, posters and photos of the works underway.

Public information cabin and footpath to the seafront
Public information cabin and footpath to the seafront

In February 2015 an additional storage area was built as construction activities increased. It was within the lagoon, seaward of the concrete drainage channel, between the Larkholme Parade access path and the site compound. The topsoil was stripped off ans stored, and the land covered in recycled material. It was used as a haul road and storage area. Two piped bridges were built across the concrete channel to allow vehicles to turn around.

Another compound was later built at the Chatsworth end of the job, when work reached the northern end of the site.

Rock Delivery and Stock Piling

Work began building the new defences back in April 2014. The first phase centred predominantly on importing rock armour and constructing the lower revetment. This work was largely out of view.

Rocks being delivered to site
Rocks being delivered to site

Delivery and stockpiling of rocks was a major undertaking in itself! The rocks, each weighing between 2.5t and 10.5t, are used to construct the rock groynes and the lower half of the sea defence revetment. Approximately 50,000 rocks were brought to site, from a dozen quarries within a 100 mile radius of site.

Each rock was weighed and sorted into stockpiles on the beach, ready to be picked and placed.

Rocks being sorted and stored on the beach
Rocks being sorted and stored on the beach

In the early days of the project, the team also had to make repairs to the existing defences. As it’s such a big job, the rest of the sea wall couldn’t be left to wash away.

Rock Armour Revetment

The rocks remove a significant amount of energy from the incoming tide and also deal with the abrasive nature of the sea below high water. They will weather the harsh conditions on this exposed part of the coastline and allow the beach to build up.

270,000 tonnes of rock armour were used to create the base of the defences.

Completed section of rock revetment
First completed section of rock revetment

The rock revetment has to be in place before the sea defence structures can be built above them. However, only a 5 metre strip can be completed on a suitable tidal shift, so it’s a slow process.

Assembling the rock revetment

During each tidal shift the beach is excavated to the required profile and covered in a 5 metre wide geotextile mat. The geotextile is a structural fabric and acts as a separation layer between the beach and rock.

Preparing the beach and building the rock revetment
Preparing the beach and building the rock revetment

A 1.8 metre thick layer of underlayer rock is placed on the geotextile followed by a 2.4 metre thick layer of larger rock on top.

Placing the rock against the sheet piles to build the revetment
Placing the rock against the sheet piles to build the revetment

Each rock is carefully and accurately placed. They have three contact points to ensure they are stable and don’t move. The voids between the rocks are just as important as the rocks are themselves.

From the face of the sheet piles the rock revetment is 25 metres wide towards the sea. For every 1 metre length of revetment, 64 tonnes of underlayer rock and 100 tonnes of the larger rock is used.

Rock Groynes

The rock groynes help to retain beach material along the foreshore and encourage the beach to build up in height.

High beach levels help to reduce the height of waves that can be generated during a storm. It’s the first line of defence in the new works.

Geotextile membrane underneath one of the rock groynes
Geotextile membrane underneath one of the new rock groynes

As most of a floating iceberg is underwater, most of a rock groyne is under the sand. In reducing the turbulence of the sea they allow the finer sand to settle out of suspension and build up the beach.

Beach Access Steps

Beach access steps are built through the rock revetment. They are also concrete, cast in-situ.

Lower precast landing units being installed at the bottom of a flight of beach access steps. September 2016
Lower precast landing units being installed at the bottom of a flight of beach access steps. September 2016

Groyne Crossover Ramps

Each set of access steps ends in a groyne crossover ramp, also cast on site. There’s a pre-cast wall between the steps and the rocks.

The purpose of the groyne crossover ramps is to allow free access across the beach. It also means you’ve always got access to a stairway when the tide is coming in.

Building a groyne crossover ramp in January 2016
Building a groyne crossover ramp in January 2016

Sheet Piling

Steel sheet piles stabilise the sea wall. They have been installed along the full length of it, between the rocks and the upper levels of concrete.

The piles are long lengths of shaped metal, designed to interlock when they’re in place. They are driven vertically into the ground with a piling rig. Most of them were vibrated into place. It’s amazing to watch – they go in like a knife into butter. Watch this clip, filmed during a public site visit.

In places there is rock and hard clay underground. So some piles were vibrated in as far as they would go and then knocked in to the correct position with a drop hammer.

Stone infill between the old sea wall and the sheet piles
Stone infill between the old sea wall and the sheet piles

Graded stone is placed and compacted on the landward side of the piles. It fills the void between the steel and the old sea wall. The stone forms part of the foundation for the precast concrete blocks which are placed later.

Sheet piles put into place
Sheet piles put into place

Step Units

Between the rock revetment and the promenade, specially manufactured precast concrete is used to form a stepped revetment to break the waves. There are more than 1000 units in total, and each one is the weight of around two double decker buses.

Completed section showing steps and wave wall units, positioned on top of the concrete blinding
Completed section showing steps and wave wall units, positioned on top of the concrete blinding

Placement of the step units began on Thursday 3 March 2016. On average, seven/eight of the precast concrete stepped revetments were installed each day.

Approximately 120 metres of revetment blinding is prepared ahead of placement of the precast revetment units.

A crane and vacuum lifting unit were used to place the precast stepped revetment units. Use of the lifting unit means that the finished quality of the precast units is not compromised with lifting eyes.

First stepped revetment unit being placed at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme in Fleetwood
First stepped revetment unit being placed at the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme in Fleetwood. Photo: April 2016
Middle row stepped revetments being placed in April 2016
Middle row stepped revetments being placed in April 2016
Aerial view of the concrete step units being placed by the crane
Aerial view of the concrete step units being placed by the crane. January 2017

Construction of the upper precast concrete revetment was significantly quicker than the lower level rock. Once the team were out of the tidal area they could continue normal working hours each day.

The Top Level Promenade

The promenade has been significantly widened. It’s also cast in concrete.

Precast concrete wave wall units sit at the top of the stepped revetment. Their job is to reflect waves back to sea. The top of them is over 2m higher than the walls which they replaced.

First three wave wall units to be placed at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
First three wave wall units to be placed at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Wave wall ‘book ends’ being installed either side of a flight of beach access steps. September 2016
Wave wall ‘book ends’ being installed either side of a flight of beach access steps. September 2016

However the rear flood wall against the grasslands is only approx 30cm (one foot) higher than it was. The efficiency of the new design means that the rear wall doesn’t need to be any higher.

The northern tie-in walls (below) are different to the standard rear walls as they have to allow for the new higher promenades to ramp down to meet the existing promenade.

Northernmost tie-in precast rear walls being installed. October 2016
Northernmost tie-in precast rear walls being installed. October 2016

Split level pathway

There’s an intermediate wall along the full length of the promenade. It’s made up of two small stepped precast blocks placed between the lower and upper levels. It’s not just an attractive feature and a huge seat. It has an important function in trapping sea water.

Intermediate precast wall units being installed between what will be the lower and upper promenades. October 2016
Intermediate precast wall units being installed between what will be the lower and upper promenades. October 2016

You can see the arrangement of these two split levels, and the access ramps/steps between them, in this aerial photo from January 2017.

Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme Fleetwood. Photo: January 2017
Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme Fleetwood. Photo: January 2017

This video was made by That’s Lancashire in April 2016. In it you can see how the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme was built.

A Test from Storm Eleanor

On 3 January 2018, Storm Eleanor blew into town, to test out the almost complete sea wall.

The site offices were at the southern end of the scheme, where the new wall joins the old at Rossall School. It was possible to safely take photos from there, showing how the new wall deals with the storm conditions, compared to the old.

This photo is looking along the top of the intermediate recurve wall, between the steps and wide promenade. The recurve wall is about 4′ high.

Storm Eleanor being controlled by Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

Standing on the promenade you can see how little sea and debris is washing over the recurve wall.

Storm Eleanor being controlled by Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Storm Eleanor being controlled by the coastal defence scheme at Rossall

By comparison…

In contrast, at the southern end of the scheme where the new wall meets the old wall, it was business as usual!

This photo is looking from the new sea wall at Westway, south towards Cleveleys. The big wave is in front of Rossall School field. You can see the school buildings at the left.

Storm Eleanor being controlled by Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

Look at the relative lack of wave activity against the new wall in the foreground of the photo.

Where the new wall ends in the the centre of the photo you can see enormous waves are forming. They’re battering the old wall and going over the top. This one photo shows just how effective the new wall is.

Opening the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

The new Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme was officially opened on 1 June 2018.

Sir James Bevan, Chief Executive of the Environment Agency and Dean Banks, Balfour Beatty Chief Executive Officer for UK Construction Services were at the opening. They were joined by Councillor Roger Berry Neighbourhood Services and Community Safety Portfolio Holder at Wyre Council and Cat Smith MP.

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held to mark the event.

Take a look at the photos from the opening day –

Time capsule buried underneath Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

Published July 2016

Pupils from Northfold Primary School in Thornton Cleveleys were inspired to fill the capsule following a trip to see the defences being built. They’ve left a lasting legacy for a future generation to discover.

The capsule was buried below the new promenade.

Class 6 at Northfold Primary School bury a time capsule
Class 6 at Northfold Primary School bury a time capsule

Items inside the time capsule include photos and mementos of everyday life. Newspapers and currency to illustrate daily life now, along with facts about the children and messages to the future.

Views about current hot topics such as the EU referendum and climate change were written about. They’ve asked questions of would-be future readers.

Content of Northfold Schools time capsule
Content of Northfold Schools time capsule

A Legacy for the Future

Air and water-tight, the time capsule is expected to remain buried for at least a hundred years. That’s the lifespan of the new sea defences.

Time capsule being buried at Rossall Sea Wall
Time capsule being buried at Rossall Sea Wall

James Rochester, Class 6 teacher at Northfold Primary School, said: “Class 6 have been learning about how coastlines change over time. So visiting the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme provided amazing first hand insight. The chance to observe the defences gradually taking shape was fascinating.

“The children benefited from consolidating their class based learning with a real life experience. They’ve also had an opportunity to leave a lasting legacy and footprint about their own lives, as well as Northfold C.P. School and the surrounding area as it is in 2016.”

An Earlier Time Capsule

You might also be interested in a time capsule that was found at Cleveleys.

Believed to have been buried in 1927 when sea defence work at that time was completed, the remnants were found in 2005 when the third phase of the Cleveleys sea defences was started.

What Rossall Sea Looked Like Before Construction Works

How quickly you forget! Take a look at Visit Fleetwood’s own collection of photos from before the new sea wall was constructed. These were all taken in 2009.

The old overflow channel and bridge at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
Bridge across the channel at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old overflow channel and bridge at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old overflow channel and bridge at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old concrete overflow channel
In the old concrete overflow channel
The old overflow channel at the seafront at Rossall
The old overflow channel at the seafront at Rossall
The old sea wall before rebuilding. The West Way opening.
Before the old wall was rebuilt. This is the West Way opening.
The old sea wall before rebuilding. The West Way opening looking south in the direction of Cleveleys
The old sea wall before rebuilding. The West Way opening looking south in the direction of Cleveleys
One of the old access ramps
One of the old access ramps
The state of the old sea wall before rebuilding, at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The state of the old sea wall before rebuilding, at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old sea wall looking northwards from West Way, at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old sea wall looking northwards from West Way
Fishing off the old sea wall at Westway, Fleetwood
Fishing off the old sea wall at Westway, Fleetwood
The old sea wall at West Way before building the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme
The old sea wall at West Way before building the Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme

While you’re here…

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4 thoughts on “Look at Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme”

  1. I’m a relative newcomer to the area and gradually finding my way. Thank you for your time and effort and obvious interest in compiling this information together.

  2. Walked along the new coastal defence scheme yesterday 30/8/2020 with my Mum in her wheelchair. It was a clear day with lovely views in all directions. First trip out for Mum in months as she’s been shielding. We were all so impressed with what’s been done; this is a really lovely public space, accessible for all, clean and well used. I had no idea it was there – what a great surprise. Excellent job. Well done all involved.

  3. Derek langford

    Why was this event not made public
    We when down to watch as a family and we saw nothing told 2 o’clock by
    Officials and it was all over when we got there at 1.30 we was very disappointed
    Also how many of the four people who cut the ribbon live in Fleetwood
    It should of been made by Fleetwood children the future of Fleetwood
    And it all looks very beautiful it really surprised me how good it looks
    The only bad thing I could see wrong was the rocks they are accident waiting to happen they very are dangerous for kids and dogs

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