The Mount Gardens

The Mount Gardens

The Mount Gardens was once a large sand-dune and rabbit warren, originally known as Tup Hill or Starr Hill. It was laid out into a park by Decimus Burton in the mid nineteenth century.

In the 1860’s, the seven acre park site was surrounded by the traditional Fylde style cobble wall which is still there today.

Burton originally built a pagoda on a raised terrace at the top of the hill. It was later demolished and the Mount Pavilion which stands there now replaced it in 1902. The clock was added in 1919.

Planting up The Mount Gardens

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Fleetwood’s most iconic feature had a facelift in 2016. The boundary wall, railings and shelters are restored to their former glory, thanks to a £1m donation and incredibly generous gift from the Lofthouse family.

The cast iron railings that topped The Esplanade wall were removed in 1942 for the Second World War. Their replacements have been specially made to replicate the ornamental pattern of the original Victorian design. They’re painted in the same shades of green which would have been used on the original installation.

New railings and restoration at The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood
New railings and restoration at The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood

26 volunteers helped to plant out the garden along the length of The Esplanade boundary wall, during the first phase of the project. 2,000 shrubs such as lavender and eucalyptus, 65 trees and 4,300 flowering bulbs including a variety of daffodils were planted.

Local residents Anne Carlos and Norma Banville (front of shot, dressed in cream) volunteered because they both wanted to give something back to the community they love.

Volunteers help to replant The Mount Gardens

Volunteers planting at The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood
Volunteers planting at The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood

Norma said: “I got involved because I absolutely love the place where I now live, and just wanted to give something back.”

Anne added: “It’s lovely at The Mount with everything that’s been done so far and it’s nice to think that we’ve played a small part in making it look even more beautiful. We’re both excited to come back and see the daffodils and say that we planted some of those!”

A group of Lancashire employees from construction firm Tarmac Readymix joined the gardening sessions.

The green fingered volunteers have planted a new rockery in the east of the garden using reclaimed limestone and a range of plants including smaller shrubs and perennials. The plants chosen are adapted to growing in coastal conditions. They’re ones with tough, leathery or hairy leaves which protect the plant from salt damage and reduce moisture loss.

Explore The Mount Gardens

Loved by locals and visitors alike, The Mount Gardens is a distinctive feature of Fleetwood. A walk to the top of the hill is rewarded with magnificent views.

The Mount Gardens Fleetwood
The Mount Gardens Fleetwood
View left from the top of the Mount Gardens
View left from the top of the Mount Gardens
View right from the top of the Mount Gardens
View right from the top of the Mount Gardens

In the rare coastal snows and ice of winter the slopes are loved by local children. It’s a rare hilly spot in the flat Fylde landscape where they can use a sledge!

Snow at The Mount Gardens Fleetwood, in 2010
Snow at The Mount Gardens Fleetwood, captured back in 2010

The front slopes of The Mount gardens are exposed to harsh salty winds and the marine environment. Because of this most of the slopes are neatly maintained grass, with some new beds added during the recent restoration.

Did you know?

There’s a webcam at the top of The Mount Gardens which broadcasts images online? The images are stills, taken every few seconds as the camera pans from left to right (not live streaming). This is one of the images. Click here or on the picture to go to the feed –

View over the Marine Hall and Gardens from the webcam at The Mount Gardens
View over the Marine Hall and Gardens from the webcam at The Mount Gardens

Mount Road Entrance to The Mount Gardens

The landward side of the The Mount Gardens is where you’ll find a lovely, traditional park. It’s almost a hidden local treasure, since it’s not obviously apparent from the main promenade. Here you’ll find a rose garden, rockeries and ornamental planting, where little has changed since it was created during the 1830’s.

Landward side of The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood
Landward side of The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood
Cherry blossom at The Mount Gardens
Cherry blossom at The Mount Gardens

There’s a children’s playground here too.

Children's Playground at the landward side of The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood
Children’s Playground at the landward side of The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood

Also built by Decimus Burton and once used as his office, is the gate lodge at the Mount Road entrance to the gardens.

The Mount Crest

Back in 2013, a team of local people began working to secure funding for the permanent Mount Crest which is set into the front slope of the gardens.

The Mount Crest in The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood. Completed in 2015
The Mount Crest in The Mount Gardens, Fleetwood. Completed in 2015

It’s a permanent memorial to commemorate all the Fleetwood people who have been killed or injured in wars or conflicts.

It enhances the existing clock war memorial. The original structure did not have a clock on it when it was built. Isaac Spencers of Fleetwood presented the clock in memory of all the Fleetwood people who had died in the First World War. Inside the pavilion is also a war memorial plaque.

The Crest created by the Community

The team who made it happen included members from Fleetwood Civic Society, Fleetwood Rotary, Fleetwood Town Council, Wyre Council, Fleetwood in Bloom, Fleetwood Chamber of Commerce, Roger Eaves Ltd among others.

Project team who worked on The Crest at The Mount Gardens Fleetwood

Front row [holding picture] Margaret Lund Fleetwood Rotary, Margaret Daniels Fleetwood Civic Society, Mark Billington Wyre Borough Council.
Second Row Cll. John Warnock Fleetwood in Bloom, Cll David Shaw Fleetwood Town Council and Fleetwood Chamber of Commerce, Deryk Martin Rotary, Maurice Dowsing Rotary. Back row Roger Eaves of Roger Eaves Ltd, Gordon Oates Rotary.

The Fleetwood Crest is 4910mm wide x 5460mm deep. A plaque adds, “In remembrance of all Fleetwood people killed or injured in wars and conflicts.” It’s the Fleetwood coast of arms, made from coloured recycled glass and resin, which is used on school playgrounds and can be power washed. It was installed at a cost of around £27,000. Up to £20,000 was granted by Fleetwood Town Council and £2,800 from Wyre Council Shaping your Neighbourhood Fund to meet the cost of installation.

The Mount Crest was unveiled at an official opening on Sunday 29 March 2015, with entertainment provided by Fleetwood Old Boys Band.

The area directly in front of The Mount Pavilion was previously used as a seasonal planted bed. Although attractive when planted, unfortunately meant that it was sometimes a bare patch of earth. The new Mount Crest looks attractive all of the time.

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